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  (July 28, 2003) -- Expedition 7 NASA ISS Science Officer Ed Lu captured this video of noctilucent clouds from the International Space Station. Scientists are intrigued by the phenomenon because the clouds, which are made up of tiny ice crystals, are extremely high in the atmosphere, and there is no known method of transport to move them into such an altitude. Lu noted that these clouds were at least 100 kilometers (62 miles) above the Earth and stretched from western Europe to Siberia. In this video, the crescent Moon is visible, as are flashes of lightning below the cloud deck. Read more about noctilucent clouds.
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  (July 28, 2003) -- Expedition 7 NASA ISS Science Officer Ed Lu captured this video of noctilucent clouds from the International Space Station. Scientists are intrigued by the phenomenon because the clouds, which are made up of tiny ice crystals, are extremely high in the atmosphere, and there is no known method of transport to move them into such an altitude. Scientists believe that the high clouds may be a new phenomenon -- possibly a result of the industrial age. Lu noted that these clouds were at least 100 kilometers (62 miles) above the Earth and stretched from western Europe to Siberia. Read more about noctilucent clouds.
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  (Sept 15, 2003) -- Expedition 7 NASA ISS Science Officer Ed Lu captured this video of Hurricane Isabel as it churned in the Atlantic Ocean. Isabel was a Category 5 storm at the time, with sustained winds of 240 kilometers (150 miles) per hour. It would reach the East Coast of the United States three days later with sustained winds of 161 kilometers (100 miles) per hour.
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  (Sept 15, 2003) -- An exterior camera on the International Space Station's S2 truss captured this video of Hurricane Isabel as it churned in the Atlantic Ocean. Isabel was a Category 5 storm at the time, with sustained winds of 240 kilometers (150 miles) per hour. It would reach the East Coast of the United States three days later with sustained winds of 161 kilometers (100 miles) per hour.
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  (November 25, 2003) -- Expedition 7 Flight Engineer Ed Lu demonstrates how food is served and eaten aboard the International Space Station.
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Curator: Kim Dismukes | Responsible NASA Official: John Ira Petty | Updated: 11/25/2003
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