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The CrewCargoTimelineEVAShuttle ArchivesPrevious mission: STS-100Next mission: STS-105STS-105: a new crew arrives at the International Space Station
Mission Patch
Image: STS-104 Insignia
Mission Highlights
Mission:International Space Station Flight 7A
Shuttle:Atlantis
Launch
Pad:
39B
Launch: July 12, 2001
4:04 a.m. CDT
Window:Less than 5 minutes
Docking:July 13, 2001
10:08 p.m. CDT
EVAs: 3 space walks
Undocking:July 21, 2001
11:54 p.m. CDT
Landing:July 24, 2001
10:39 p.m. CDT
Duration:12 days,
18 hours,
35 minutes
Orbit
Altitude:
240 nautical
miles
Orbit
Inclination:
51.6
Related Links
*Space Station Robotic Arm
*Space Station Science
*STS-104 Interactive
(Requires Flash Player)
*STS-104 Videos
*STS-104 Wakeup Calls
*MCC Answers to Internet Questions
Imagery
IMAGE: Quest Airlock being carried into position by Canadarm2
From the Gallery: Canadarm2 moves the Quest Airlock into position for installation onto the space station's Unity Node.

STS-104 Delivers Quest to International Space Station
Space Shuttle Atlantis spent 13 days in orbit, eight of those days docked with the International Space Station. While at the orbital outpost, the STS-104 crew delivered the Quest Airlock and installed it on the station's Unity Node.

Expedition Two Flight Engineer Susan Helms used the space station's robot arm, Canadarm2, to lift Quest from the orbiter's payload bay. At the same time, STS-104 Mission Specialists Michael Gernhardt and James Reilly conducted a space walk, guiding Helms' movements as she installed Quest onto the station.

A week later Gernhardt and Reilly would use the brand-new airlock for the third space walk of the mission.


Gernhardt during space walk
*STS-104 Press Kit
*Mission Status Reports
*Expedition Two Crew
*Space Station Science
*MCC Answers to Internet Questions

IMAGE: Mission Specialist James Reilly in Quest.
Mission Specialist James Reilly made history on July 20, 2001, gliding through the space station's new airlock for the first station-based exterior space walk.

Three Space Walks Prepare Quest for Use
Mission Specialists Michael Gernhardt and James Reilly conducted three space walks while Space Shuttle Atlantis was docked to the International Space Station. They spent a total of 16 hours and 30 minutes outside.

During the first space walk, Gernhardt and Reilly assisted in the installation of the airlock. During the second and third excursions, they focused on the external outfitting of the Quest Airlock with four High Pressure Gas Tanks, handrails and other vital equipment.


Curator: Kim Dismukes | Responsible NASA Official: John Ira Petty | Updated: 12/10/2003
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