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The CrewCargoTimelineEVAShuttle ArchivesPrevious mission: STS-112Next mission: STS-107STS-113: a new crew for the International Space Station
Time in Orbit

How does this work?
Mission Patch
IMAGE: STS-113 crew patch
Mission Highlights
Mission:International Space Station Flight 11A
Shuttle:Endeavour
Launch
Pad:
39A
Launch:

Nov. 23, 2002
6:50 p.m. CST

Window:5-10 minutes
Docking:Nov. 25, 2002
3:59 p.m. CST
EVAs:3 spacewalks
Undocking:Dec. 2, 2002
2:05 p.m. CST
Landing: Dec. 7, 2002
1:37 p.m. CST
Duration:

13 days,
18 hours,
47 minutes

Orbital
Insertion
Altitude:
122 nautical
miles
Orbit
Inclination:
51.60
Related Links
*STS-113 Press Kit (3.2 Mb PDF)
*Latest ISS Statistics
* Mobile Servicing System
*Canadian Space Agency
Imagery

IMAGE: Expedition Five NASA ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson
Moments after undocking, Expedition Five NASA ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson watches through a shuttle window as the International Space Station -- her home for six months -- grows more distant.

Visit the Gallery to see STS-113 images and videos.

STS-113 Delivers New Crew, Truss Segment to Station
During a 14-day mission in November and December 2002, Space Shuttle Endeavour and its crew extended the International Space Station's backbone and exchanged the Expedition Five and Six crews. With Commander Jim Wetherbee and Pilot Paul Lockhart at the controls, Endeavour docked with the station Nov. 25 to begin seven days of station assembly, spacewalks and crew and equipment transfers.

STS-113 was the 16th shuttle mission to the station. It continued the station's outward expansion with the delivery of the P1 (P-One) Truss. Mission Specialists John Herrington and Michael Lopez-Alegria performed three spacewalks to activate and outfit the P1. Also, the STS-113 and both Expedition crews transferred about 1,969 kilograms (4,340 pounds) of cargo between the shuttle and station.

STS-113 delivered the Expedition Six crew -- Commander Ken Bowersox, NASA ISS Science Officer Don Pettit and Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin -- to the station for a four-month increment. The Expedition Five crew -- Commander Valery Korzun, Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev and NASA ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson -- returned to Earth aboard STS-113, ending an 185-day stay in space.

STS-113 came to a close when Space Shuttle Endeavour glided in to a landing at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., Dec. 7. It was the 19th flight of Endeavour and the 112th shuttle mission. The landing was the first time a mission ended on the fourth day of landing attempts.

Click here for an interactive view of STS-113. (Requires Flash Player)


IMAGE: Space Shuttle Endeavour
*STS-113 Ask the MCC Answers
*STS-113 Ask the Crew Answers
*Integrated Truss Structure
*STS-113 Mission Overview (778 Kb PDF)

Spacewalks

IMAGE: STS-113 spacewalker Michael Lopez-Alegria
Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria works on the newly installed P1 (P-One) Truss on the International Space Station during STS-113's Thanksgiving Day spacewalk.

Spacewalkers Outfit New Truss Segment
During its stay at the International Space Station, the STS-113 crew conducted three spacewalks. The main objective of the excursions was the outfitting and the activation of the P1 (P-One) Truss, which was installed onto the International Space Station on Nov. 26, 2002. Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington performed all three spacewalks, including one on Thanksgiving Day.

Pilot Paul Lockhart coordinated spacewalk activities, and Commander Jim Wetherbee operated the Space Shuttle Endeavour's robot arm. Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox and NASA ISS Science Officers Peggy Whitson and Don Pettit spent time at the controls of the station's robot arm. All three spacewalks were based out the station's Quest Airlock.


IMAGE: The Expedition Six crew
From left to right, the Expedition Six crew: NASA ISS Science Officer Don Pettit, Commander Ken Bowersox and Flight Engineer Nikolai Budarin.

Space Shuttle Endeavour Delivers Expedition Six to ISS
STS-113 was the fifth International Space Station crew rotation flight by a space shuttle. Expedition Six Commander Ken Bowersox and Flight Engineers Don Pettit and Nikolai Budarin traveled aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour to the station to replace the Expedition Five crew. The Expedition Six crewmembers will have a four-month tour of duty on the orbital outpost. They are scheduled to return to Earth with STS-114 in March 2003.

The Expedition Five crew -- Commander Valery Korzun, Flight Engineer Sergei Treschev and NASA ISS Science Officer Peggy Whitson -- wrapped up a six-month stay when Endeavour departed the station.


Curator: Kim Dismukes | Responsible NASA Official: John Ira Petty | Updated: 11/18/2004
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