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Photo-sl3-135p-3371

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SL3-135P-3371 (15 Aug. 1973) --- The Skylab space station's Extreme Ultraviolet monitor is a closed loop television system that permitted man for the first time to actually watch the sun's image in the extreme ultraviolet radiation emitted from its million-degree outer atmosphere, the corona. This photograph shows a view of the TV scope made by scientist-astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, on Aug. 15, 1973. Dr. Garriott made this picture with a Land-Polaroid SX-70 camera -- the first time that any Polaroid camera has been used in space. With in-flight photographs such as this Dr. Garriott was able to compare the sun's curious, ever-changing appearance in the extreme ultraviolet with the image on his TV screen and to spot important changes in the sun. The XUV monitor was designed and constructed by the Naval Research Laboratory, Dr. R. Tousey, Principal Investigator, together with the Ball Brothers Research Corporation, under the sponsorship of the Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama. Photo credit: NASA

Curator: JSC PAO Web Team | Responsible NASA Official: Amiko Kauderer | Updated: 12/09/2013
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